The Ocean County Compendium of  History
Your Subtitle text

Super Storm Sandy


___________________________________________________

A Message from the OCCH



The Ocean County Compendium of History wishes to extend our deepest and most
sincere sympathies to those residents who have lost loved ones as a result of the storm, and condolences as well to those who have lost or saw damage to their properties.


Rebuilding our county will be a challenge, but as we have done in the past we will recover
and make Ocean County an even great place to live than it was before.

The OCCH looks forward to job ahead.

___________________________________________________


The Frankenstorm of 2012
___________________________________________________


On October 29, 20122, in what was dubbed in the media as a "Frankenstorm," Hurricane Sandy tore across Ocean County in a direct hit as she merged with a nor'easter.  The combination of the two storms formed a terrific force that destroyed much of our coastline and inland areas as well as  the communities on them.
___________________________________________________



An aerial view of the Mantoloking Bridge after the storm
(Photo US Coast Guard)
___________________________________________________

As a fuller picture of the devastation unfolded it was apparent that Ocean County had never seen such an incredible storm in all of its recorded history, and what it left behind is like nothing we have ever seen before.



An unidentified man stands in the receding flood in Holly Park
___________________________________________________


Perhaps the most infamous storm in memory prior to Sandy was the Ash Wednesday Nor'easter on March 8, 1962, which is still vividly remembered by our residents for its destruction of Long Beach Island and the taking of the lives of an island mayor and police chief.



The USS Monssen DD-748 can be seen in the background where it beached during the storm
___________________________________________________


There is evidence of other storms that have visited our shores such as the two Nor'easters that bookended the opening and closing of the Cranberry Inlet in 1740 and 1812 respectively.  The birth of that inlet, which was once situated near modern-day Island Beach State Park, is reminiscent of a new breach cut through by Sandy in Mantoloking.



An aerial view of a new waterway that was cut through the island in Mantoloking
during the storm

(Photo US Coast Guard)
___________________________________________________

Super Storm Sandy will likely mark a new era in our county's history and it will be spoken about for generations to come just as the Nor'easter of 1962 has been over the last 50 years.  As of this reporting on November 3, 2012, it is way too early to realize the full impact of the storm, but future historians will have much to write about when all is said and done.

___________________________________________________



Website Builder